c First description of CDC flies by Charles Bickel in 1924

Schweizer Fliegen – Mouches Suisses – Swiss Flies

First description of CDC flies by Charles Bickel in 1924

 

The first CDC flies in Switzerland

The flies of the 401-424 series are the first documented CDC (cul de canard) flies in Switzerland. Based on their position in the Mouches de Vallorbe fly book, they must have been tied for the first time around 1924. Charles Bickel was experimenting with all kinds of feathers at that time.

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924) Serie 401 -424

Sales board for the Bickel CDC 401-424Big image/ Zoom

 

Description of the CDC Bickel flies numbers 401-418 in 1924

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  Bickel first description of CDC flies

Translation of french fly tying terms

 

When describing the flies of the Bickel CDC, reference is often made to other flies. There is also a 200 series with the same bodies, but the main difference is the type of feathers used.

The 400 series feathers are described as "ailes grasses de la queue du canard (about like "fat duck tail wings")" first description of the use of the CDC. This is therefore the first mention of what is now called "cul de canard" (CDC)

Making of the CDC Bickel flies numbers 419-424 in 1924

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  Bickel first description of CDC flies

Translation of french fly tying terms

 

The CDC 419-426 were described later in the same year in Bickel's catalog and sewn in as originals.

To establish the sales board for the Bickel CDC 401-424, some numbers were changed. For the detailed description below, we use the numbers of the sales board.

You do not need a lot to remake these flies. We recommend the Swissflies hook SFS , waxed thread 8/0 in the indicated colors. For the body you use according to the pattern peacock quill, different silk threads, wool, floss, Dubbings or Rafia (SwissR). The CDC feathers must be fine and in natural colors.

 

How to make a Bickel CDC fly

The Bickel CDC flies have a very simple design.
The body is made of various materials such as peacock quill, silk, linen, etc. and is built up on the hook (usually sizes 14-18) clamped in the vise. The flies have no tail fibers.
Then a fine CDC feather is tied and wound like a hackle.
The end knot is tied behind the CDC heel ring so that the CDC fibers protrude slightly to the front.

 

Making of Bickel CDC 401 - tying video by Stefan Wenger

 

Bickel tool

To cut the CDC to the right length, you best use the wooden Bickel tool

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  Bickel tool

Bickel Tool

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  Bickel tool

It is simple to use a small tube (Bickel tool) into which the fly is inserted head first. the backward CDC fibers are then cut off at the height of the hook arch.

Available in different sizes (adapted to hook size) or as set of all 3 sizes

Innendurchmesser/ diamètre/ diameter

Detailed description of the flies

Only if talented fly tiers of today tie and flyfishermen fish the successful patterns of yesterday, this unique cultural heritage can be preserved from destruction and oblivion.

Swissflies offers remakes with original materials but tied on modern barbless hooks

Copyright Swissflies - Swiss historical flies. Any commercial use of texts, pictures, names or remake of the flies presented herein is forbidden without the written permission of Swissflies, the holder of all rights.

 

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  401 detail

Bickel 401: black or brown fine thread, body peacock herls quill, CDC natural grey- brown

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  402 detail

Bickel 402: black or brown fine thread, body peacock eye quill, CDC natural grey- brown

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  403 detail

Bickel 403: body fine grey wool or rabbitdubbing grey natural, CDC natural grey- brown

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  404 detail

Bickel 404: black or brown fine thread, body grey floss, CDC natural grey- brown

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  405 detail

Bickel 405: thread/ body wine red floss, CDC natural grey- brown

The wine-red Bickel is a typical late summer fly, also convincing in full sunshine on difficult fish.

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  407 detail

Bickel 407: thread grey or beige, body silk thread light olive (Zwicky Iris 597 or 598), CDC natural grey- brown

The 407 is successful when the olives are flying, i.e. from April until the end of June. And then in autumn it is excellent for grayling.

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  412 detail

Bickel 412: thread brown, body orange wool, CDC natural grey- brown

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  414 detail

Bickel 414: thread black, body black silk, CDC natural grey- brown

The black Bickel actually works everywhere and at all times. But it's at its best exactly where the inventor hardly thought of it: Unbeatable CDC in a mountain lake!

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

Mouches de Vallorbe (1924)  417 detail

Bickel 417: thread dark brown or black, body brown silk, CDC natural grey- brown

I like to fish with the brown in summer, even in small streams, under bushes. It's also an insider tip for tricky grayling until November.

Grösse/ hameçon/ size

 

Swissflies offers remakes with original materials but tied on modern barbless hooks

 

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Coming soon: more fly patterns from Mouches de Vallorbe (we have more than 3000 further unpublished historic fly patterns- a lot of work to do).

 

 

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Copyright Swissflies - Swiss historical flies. Any commercial use of texts, pictures, names or remake of the flies presented herein is forbidden without the written permission of Swissflies, the holder of all rights.

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